Championing grief-sensitive schools.

New York Life has launched a groundbreaking program called the Grief-Sensitive Schools Initiative to better equip educators and other school personnel to care for grieving students.

Through the program, New York Life trains interested agents and employees to meet with schools in their local communities, make educators aware of the prevalence and impact of grief among school-age children, and direct educators to resources designed by the Coalition to Support Grieving Students.

“Although student tragedies and acts of violence strike our communities all too often, creating urgent concern around issues of death and grief at school, grief is an issue that educators encounter in the classroom every single day,” says Heather Nesle, president of the New York Life Foundation.

 

Our challenge

Renowned expert David J Schofeld weighs in

Building on our commitment

In 2013, the Foundation partnered with the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement to convene the Coalition to Support Grieving Students, a collaboration among leading K-12 professional organizations to develop and deliver the best possible grief support resources to educators through its dedicated site. 

The GSSI is an extension of the Coalition’s work, serving to direct schools and districts to accessible grief resources to empower even more educators to support their students.

As a part of the program, New York Life trains interested and qualified agents and employees on how to support grieving students. These GSSI ambassadors then connect with schools (which must be accredited K-12 public or private institutions) to offer a presentation on the issue of grief at school and direct educators to existing grief resources that can help them provide a more supportive environment for their students.

Support from educators reduces the impact of grief

The Grief-Sensitive Schools Initiative in action

Watch the videos below that show how support provided through the GSSI addresses these issues.2,3

 

Become a grief-sensitive school

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