While most Americans understand the importance of talking about grief, people are growing tired of discussing death and loss, according to new research from the New York Life Foundation.

The report includes consumer research focused on three distinct areas:

  • Grief support and conversations on death/loss taking place at home
  • Parents’ views on grief support in school and after school
  • Employed Americans’ awareness of workplace bereavement policies and efforts and what enhancements they would like to see

This year’s State of Grief Report found that 74 percent of respondents want to focus on lighter topics of conversation more than two years after the COVID-19 pandemic began. Despite this fatigue, 78 percent think more can be done to increase awareness of grief support services, and 68 percent would like a more open dialogue around grief in the U.S.

“Our message is that we need to focus on resiliency, realize the power in creating a supportive community, and continue to encourage open conversations about grief in support of those who are suffering."—Heather Nesle, President of the New York Life Foundation

“The pandemic was an inflection point for the nation and a unique moment in time for us in the bereavement field to raise awareness about bereavement and grief and the resources available, while the world was paying attention,” says Heather Nesle, president of the New York Life Foundation, one of the largest corporate funders of support for childhood bereavement. “Our message is that we need to focus on resiliency, realize the power in creating a supportive community, and continue to encourage open conversations about grief in support of those who are suffering."

Read the full State of Grief Report.

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Media contact
Lacey Siegel
New York Life Insurance Company
(212) 576-7937
Lacey_S_Siegel@newyorklife.com

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